Christine’s FWG Walks: Late August #2

by Christine Hanrahan

Christine is one of FWG’s volunteer naturalists who writes in great detail about her visits to FWG. A great way to visit with us virtually and keep on top of what you might see when here in person!

Hi All,

This is really just a note to let you know that I have uploaded some fantastic photos by Diane Lepage, to the August Pbase photo blog.
She was there in the late afternoon, working with Brian, Sandy and Barry, to remove the abundant flowering rush from the pond.

Last year, by the way, the flowering rush was greatly diminished thanks to the work of the muskrats in the pond. I regularly watched them gathering and eating flowering rush roots. But we seem to have lost our muskrats this year. [Ed note – anyone have a spare muskrat to lend us ;) ] Continue reading

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Christine’s FWG Walks: Late August

by Christine Hanrahan

Christine is one of FWG’s volunteer naturalists who writes in great detail about her visits to FWG. A great way to visit with us virtually and keep on top of what you might see when here in person!

Hi all,

There is always something interesting to see at the FWG, and today was no exception. While walking through the garden with a couple of visitors from England, we were astonished to see an American Bittern take off from just west of the old field, about 4 feet away from us. It had been standing in the midst of sow-thistles, and it landed in the middle of the buckwheat field.

While looking across the buckwheat field, before we saw the bittern, we could see at least 50 monarchs!! It was quite the sight, believe me. There were more in the BYG, and elsewhere. Continue reading

Mad about mothing – the OTHER winged beauty

by Diane Lepage // FWG Butterfly Meadow Coordinator

Macaria promiscuata – Promiscuous Angle Moth. Photo by Diane Lepage.

Moths are very interesting creatures that are worth paying attention to. My interest for those beautiful and sometimes oddly shaped moths started in my early adulthood, and increased when I got my first digital camera. It was originally the Silkworm moth family, such as the Luna moth,   my attention and made me pursue this hobby. For me, it became a serious interest and some would say a passion! With over 1500 species in Canada, I was sure to be busy for a long time looking for all those beautiful moths. Continue reading